A campus (and a school) designed to make you jealous that you didn’t go there.


Not surprisingly, the College of the Atlantic is a much nicer campus than the state university where I got my degrees, or the Ivy League college where I work.

Whale Jawbone.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
Whale jawbone.
 

Dumpster Marine Graffiti.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
Even their dumpsters are more hip than yours.
 

Sculpture, lawns, gardens.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
Sculpture, lawns, and formal gardens.
 

1895 Summer Cottage.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
The 1895 Summer Cottage.
 

Book Sculpture.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
One of several book sculptures in one of the gardens.
 

Nautical Stuff with view of Frenchman's Bay.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
Nautical stuff and Frenchman’s Bay.
 

The campus dock on Frenchman's Bay.  College of the Atlantic.  Bar Harbor, Maine
The campus dock on Frenchman’s Bay.
 

The College of the Atlantic
Bar Harbor Maine

Where else would you put it?


Here on Mount Desert Island, people put things on top of roofs and such.

Pig on top of Mainely Meats restaurant at Atlantic Brewing Company, Mount Desert Island, Maine
On top of the restaurant at Atlantic Brewing Company
 

The Blues Brothers on top of the Mount Desert Water Company, Mount Desert Island, Maine
On top of the Mount Desert Water Company
 

Lobster on top of a pole, waterfront, Bar Harbor, Mount Desert Island, Maine
On top of a pole at the Bar Harbor waterfront
 

Around Mount Desert (pronounced like “dessert”) Island
Maine

It was almost too nice a day for Maine.


The Carriage Roads at Acadia are hilly, winding, perfectly-maintained dirt and gravel paths, closed to motor vehicles.

Acadia National Park Carriage Roads: signpost 17 near Day Mountain
The signposts are works of art. (near Day Mountain)
 

Acadia National Park Carriage Roads: along Bubble Pond
Along the west side of Bubble Pond
 

Acadia National Park Carriage Roads: Park Loop Road Bridge north of Bubble Pond
At a Park Loop Road bridge just north of Bubble Pond
 

Acadia National Park Carriage Roads: Northeast Edge of Eagle Lake
Lunch stop at the northeast edge of Eagle Lake. (Orange is so becoming!)
 

Acadia National Park Carriage Roads: Northeast Edge of Eagle Lake
Marlin (politely) says he was happy that we did the extra four miles around Eagle Lake.
Especially on the very hilly western side.
 

Carriage Roads
Acadia National Park
Mount Desert Island, Maine

Catamarans are cat-tastic!


We didn’t see any whales (a bit too early in the season for the Gulf of Maine), but there were plenty of seals and puffins, and blue skies.

Our whale-watch boat: Friendship V out of Bar Harbor, Maine
Our whale-watch boat: Friendship V
 

Lighthouse at Petit Matan Island, Maine
Lighthouse at Petit Matan Island
 

Ten seals on Mount Desert Rock, Maine
Ten seals on Mount Desert Rock, off the coast of Maine
 

The Lighthouse at Mount Desert Rock, Maine
The Lighthouse at Mount Desert Rock, off the coast of Maine
 

Mount Desert Island as seen from the Sea
Mount Desert Island as seen from the Sea
 

Whalewatch
from Bar Harbor, Maine

Even at town meeting


Because we have a popular-vote-losing president, who has shown himself to be a liar, a xenophobe, a bigot, and a spreader of fear and distrust, good people all over the country have decided to take the real greatness of America into their own hands. Like this sign announcing New England Town Meetings on Mount Desert Island in Maine.

Mount Desert, Bar Harbor Town Meeting: All are welcome here.  Together we ALL make America great.
TOGETHER WE ALL MAKE AMERICA GREAT.

TOWN MEETING: All are welcome here. All races. All religions. All ethnicities. All countries of origin. All sexual orientations. All gender identities. All abilities and disabilities. All languages. All ages. Together we ALL make America great.

Sign in a convenience store
Downtown
Bar Harbor, Maine

Because they’re there?


Acadia Mountain and Saint Sauveur Mountain are two 600-700 hills along the west side of Somes Sound with a rocky-scamble loop trail.

Near the beginning of the trail to Acadia Mountain, Acadia National Park, Maine
Near the beginning of the trail up Acadia Mountain
 

View of Somes Sound, Trail to Acadia Mountain, Acadia National Park, Maine
View of Somes Sound along the trail up to Acadia Mountain
 

Cairns, Trail to Acadia Mountain, Acadia National Park, Maine
One of the cairns
 

Titanic Hikers, Trail to St. Sauveur Mountain, Acadia National Park, Maine
Self-portrait along the trail to St Sauveur Mountain
 

The best sandwich ever.  Lunch at the summit of St. Sauveur Mountain, Acadia National Park, Maine
The best sandwich ever. Lunch at the summit of St. Sauveur Mountain
 

Acadia National Park
Mount Desert Island, ME

Signs Seen on Vacation.


We played tourist in downtown Bar Harbor today.

No Hunting, Fishing, or Trapping in the Independent Cafe, Bar Harbor ME
No hunting, fishing, or trapping is allowed inside the Independent Cafe coffee shop!
 

Lobsters relaxing in a hot tub.  Stewman's Restaurant, Bar Harbor ME
Most lobsters actually do not enjoy hot tubs.
 

H8UALL License Plate: What it's like to live among tourists.  Bar Harbor ME
The pain of living among tourists.
 

Downtown
Bar Harbor, ME

This is why I take US-1 instead of I-95.


Kitch!

US-1 in Maine: Bath Bicycle Shop, Bath ME

US-1 in Maine: Maine Tourmaline, Belfast ME

Along US Route 1
[1] Bath Bicycle Shop, Bath Maine
[2] Maine Tourmaline, (Next to Perry’s Nuthouse), Belfast Maine

Narrow-Gauge Geek-Out!


Cruising down Maine Route 218, I saw signs for the Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway Museum.

Although the museum wasn’t officially open and the trains weren’t running, several remarkable volunteers (thanks, Steve and the other guys!) led me on a railroad geek-out tour, and taught me all sorts of interesting stuff about narrow-gauge (two feet between the rails) railroad systems.

The advantage of narrow-gauge systems was cost. Rails, right-of-way, maintenance, and equipment were all much more affordable, and could be more easily be implemented for smaller towns. Serendipitously, narrow-gauge railroads are also easier for organizations like the WW&FRM to maintain, rebuild, and re-create.

Stationmaster's office: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
The annual Fall Work Weekend at a beautifully replicated stationmaster’s office.

Engine 9: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
Engine 9 – Admit it: you want this in your back yard.

Building a new roundhouse: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
Building a new narrow-gauge roundhouse (from the original plans).

Passenger car: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
Inside one of the passenger cars. Quite luxurious.

Spare narrow-gauge railroad wheels: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
Narrow-gauge railroad wheels.

The engine house: Wiscasset, Waterville, & Farmington Railway
The workhouse.

Wiscasset, Waterville, and Farmington Railway Museum
Cross Road
Alna, Maine